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Ruth Etting - I

Charted on Billboard at #2 in 1929 - Ruth Etting (November 23, 1897 — September 24, 1978) was an American singing star and actress of the 1920s and 1930s, who had over 60 hit recordings and worked in stage, radio, and film.
Views: 23524
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Time: 03:30 More in Music

After You've Gone Words by Henry Creamer Music by Turner Layton Performed by Ruth Etting March 1, 1927 Columbia 995-D Henry Creamer (1879-1930) and Turner Layton (1894-1978), a vaudeville duo, wrote more than 60 tunes between 1917 and 1923 and "After You've Gone" was probably their greatest hit. It had been added to the score of the musical "So Long Letty" at the beginning of it's successful road tour. The song became very popular but nobody could buy the sheet music since it hadn't been officially published yet. It was first recorded by Campbell and Burr in April 1918 followed by Marion Harris in July 1918. Both sang it as a slow ballad which is the same way Ruth Etting sings it on this recording. It had languished until being revived in 1927, by the successful recordings of Ruth Etting, Bessie Smith and Sophie Tucker and the more upbeat tempos by the dance and jazz bands including Louis Armstrong, Charleston Chasers, Paul Whiteman and the California Ramblers. Since then it has become one of the most recorded of all popular tunes and has been performed by such artist as Frank Sinatra, Ella Fitzgerald, Benny Goodman and Judy Garland.
From: bsgs98
Views: 67440
449 ratings
Time: 03:06 More in Music

Views: 131141
680 ratings
Time: 03:21 More in Music

"All Of Me" Words and Music by Seymour Simons and Gerald Marks (first recorded by Belle Baker,1931). Recorded by Ruth Etting at December, 1931 You took my kisses and all my love You taught me how to care Am I to be just remnant of a one side love affair All you took I gladly gave There is nothing left for me to save All of me Why not take all of me Can't you see I'm no good without you Take my lips I want to loose them Take my arms I'll never use them Your goodbye left me with eyes that cry How can I go on dear without you You took the part that once was my heart So why not take all of me
From: Aad Juijn
Views: 136029
747 ratings
Time: 03:10 More in Music

Ruth's mother died when Ruth was five years old. She spent her childhood living with her Aunt Rose and Grandmother, Mrs. George Etting. She enjoyed singing in church and at school but never had any voice lessons. While in high school, she became intrigued with clothing design. She designed and made her own dress for the Junior-Senior banquet, a scoop-neck, sleeveless dress that was scandalous at the time. After graduating from David City High School, she attended the Chicago Academy of Fine Arts to study clothing design. She was employed by Marigold Gardens, a new night club in Chicago, as a costume designer for the chorus line. One evening, when they were one girl short in the chorus line, Ruth was asked to take her place. She had natural talent and was soon their lead singer and star. Ruth married Moe Snyder, who worked as a bodyguard for entertainers traveling to Chicago. He used his connections to further Ruth's career. Flo Ziegfield saw her perform in Chicago and hired her as the star of the Ziegfield Follies from 1927-1931. She sang and performed across the U.S. and starred in several Hollywood movies. As Ruth's popularity soared, Moe's jealousy and strong-arm tactics became a liability her career could no longer tolerate. After divorcing Moe, Ruth moved to California and purchased a car agency which she ran with the help of Art Etting. When Moe heard that Ruth was spending a lot of time with Art and her accompanist and arranger, Meryl Alderman, he shot Meryl and shot at Ruth, but missed. Meryl was not critically injured and he and Ruth were married two months later. Ruth's career did not survive the sensational divorce and Moe's trial. After World War II and Meryl's return to civilian life, Ruth and Meryl moved to David City for a short time, then settled in Colorado Springs, CO. Ruth died in 1978 at 81 years of age.
From: Aad Juijn
Views: 91047
493 ratings
Time: 03:05 More in Music

The Boswell Sisters were a close harmony singing group, consisting of sisters Martha Boswell (June 9, 1905 -- July 2, 1958), Connee Boswell (original name Connie) (December 3, 1907 -- October 11, 1976), and Helvetia "Vet" Boswell (May 20, 1911 -- November 12, 1988), noted for intricate harmonies and rhythmic experimentation. They attained national prominence in the USA in the 1930s.
Views: 87312
536 ratings
Time: 03:14 More in Music

Check out interview with Annette Hanshaw here: http://www.santiye.tv/play/9MRDc2bgAzI/Annette_Hanshaw__Ive_Got_A_Feeling_Im_Falling.html"font-size: 11px; line-height: 1.4em; padding-left: 20px; padding-top: 1px;" width="146" valign="top">
Views: 118780
910 ratings
Time: 02:57 More in Music

Ruth Etting (Nov.23,1896 - Sept.24,1978) was an American singing star of the 1930s, who had over sixty hit recordings. Her signature tunes were "Shine On Harvest Moon", "Ten Cents a Dance" and "Love Me or Leave Me", and her other popular recordings included "Button Up Your Overcoat", "Mean to Me", "Exactly like you", and "Shaking the Blues Away". Rising to fame in the twenties and early thirties, Ruth Etting was renowned for her great beauty, her gorgeous voice and her tragic life. She starred on Broadway, made movies in Hollywood, married a mobster, had numerous hit-records, fell in love and was known as America's Sweetheart of Song. Born in David City, Nebraska, Ruth left home at seventeen for Chicago and art school. She got a job designing costumes at a night club called the Marigold Gardens and when the tenor got sick, she was pulled into the show since she was the only one who could sing low enough. That led to dancing in the chorus line and eventually featured solos. Her career in costume design and art was soon forgotten. The blond hair and blue eyes and stunning voice all led to her being dubbed the Sweetheart of Columbia Records, America's Radio Sweetheart, and finally America's Sweetheart of Song. She began to experiment with tempo and phrasing during this period in her career. Her trademark was to change the tempo - alternating between normal tempo, half-time and double-time to create and maintain interest. Ruth Etting made her first record in 1926 and her last in 1937. Completely lacking in the performer's ego, she called her early recordings corny and kept none of her original 78's. In 1955 her story was made into a movie, ultimately nominated for six Academy Awards and winning the Award for Best Story. Ruth Etting died on September 24 1978, in Colorado Springs. Ruth Etting - Ten Cents a Dance (1930)
Views: 200458
1147 ratings
Time: 03:18 More in Music

Fanny Brice - I'd Rather Be Blue Over You (Than Be Happy With Somebody Else) (Billy Rose/ Fred Fisher), Victor 1929
From: 240252
Views: 149284
849 ratings
Time: 02:20 More in Music

From the movie "A Regular Trouper", 1932
Views: 68611
437 ratings
Time: 02:52 More in Music

Shine On, Harvest Moon (from Ziegfeld Follies of 1931) Words and music by Nora Bayes and Jack Norworth Ruth Etting, vocal. Recorded July 28, 1931, in New York. Originally issued on Perfect 12737. This song was first introduced by Nora Bayes and songwriter-husband, Jack Norworth in the Ziegfeld Follies of 1908. Ruth Etting's performance of the song in the Ziegfeld Follies of 1931 was a tribute to Nora Bayes. The 1931 production of the Follies was the last to be produced under the direction Florenz Ziegfeld, Jr.; he died shortly thereafter in 1932. It's interesting to note that Nora Bayes recorded this song for Victor in 1910 but it was never released. "Oh, shine on, shine on, harvest moon up in the sky, I ain't had no lovin' since April, January, June, or July. Snow time ain't no time to stay outdoors and spoon, So shine on, shine on, harvest moon, For me and my gal." FULL HARVEST MOON Traditionally, this designation goes to the full moon that occurs closest to the Autumnal (fall) Equinox. In the northern hemisphere the Harvest Moon usually comes in September, and this year (2014) it will fall on September 9 at 1:38 UTC. At the peak of the harvest, farmers can work into the night by the light of this moon. Usually the full Moon rises an average of 50 minutes later each night, but for the few nights around the Harvest Moon, the moon seems to rise at nearly the same time each night: just 25 to 30 minutes later across the U.S., and only 10 to 20 minutes later for much of Canada and Europe. Corn, pumpkins, squash, beans, and wild rice — the chief Indian staples — are now ready for gathering.
From: bsgs98
Views: 222811
1008 ratings
Time: 02:49 More in Music

Lyrics by Gus Kahn Music by Isham Jones (c) 1924 Performed by Ruth Etting From the film: Melody in May (1936)
Views: 43681
217 ratings
Time: 02:35 More in Music

Ruth Etting (Nov.23,1896 - Sept.24,1978) was an American singing star of the 1930s, who had over sixty hit recordings. Her signature tunes were "Shine On Harvest Moon", "Ten Cents a Dance" and "Love Me or Leave Me", and her other popular recordings included "Button Up Your Overcoat", "Mean to Me", "Exactly like you", and "Shaking the Blues Away". Rising to fame in the twenties and early thirties, Ruth Etting was renowned for her great beauty, her gorgeous voice and her tragic life. She starred on Broadway, made movies in Hollywood, married a mobster, had numerous hit-records, fell in love and was known as America's Sweetheart of Song. Born in David City, Nebraska, Ruth left home at seventeen for Chicago and art school. She got a job designing costumes at a night club called the Marigold Gardens and when the tenor got sick, she was pulled into the show since she was the only one who could sing low enough. That led to dancing in the chorus line and eventually featured solos. Her career in costume design and art was soon forgotten. The blond hair and blue eyes and stunning voice all led to her being dubbed the Sweetheart of Columbia Records, America's Radio Sweetheart, and finally America's Sweetheart of Song. She began to experiment with tempo and phrasing during this period in her career. Her trademark was to change the tempo - alternating between normal tempo, half-time and double-time to create and maintain interest. Ruth Etting made her first record in 1926 and her last in 1937. Completely lacking in the performer's ego, she called her early recordings corny and kept none of her original 78's. In 1955 her story was made into a movie, ultimately nominated for six Academy Awards and winning the Award for Best Story. Ruth Etting - Out Of Nowhere (1931)
Views: 42201
225 ratings
Time: 03:05 More in Music

Victor 21863-A - This Song Peaked At #3 On US Music Charts In 1929. Song written by Ray Henderson, Buddy DeSylva & Lew Brown. This Is The Original Victor Version, I Also Have The Remastered One Posted As Well. Helen Kane (August 4, 1904 - September 26, 1966) was an American popular singer; her signature song was "I Wanna Be Loved By You". Kane's voice and appearance were a likely source for Fleischer Studios animator Grim Natwick when creating Betty Boop, although It-girl Clara Bow is another possible influence. Born as Helen Clare Schroeder, Kane attended St. Anselm's Parochial School in the Bronx. She was the youngest of three children. Her father, Louis Schroeder, the son of a German immigrant, was employed intermittently; her Irish immigrant mother, Ellen (Dixon) Schroeder, worked in a laundry. Kane's mother reluctantly paid $3 for her daughter's costume as a queen in Kane's first theatrical role at school. By the time she was 15 years, Kane was onstage professionally, touring the Orpheum Circuit with the Marx Brothers in On the Balcony. She spent the early 1920s trouping in vaudeville as a singer and kickline dancer with a theater engagement called the 'All Jazz Revue.' She played the New York Palace for the first time in 1921. Her Broadway days started there as well with the Stars of the Future (1922--24, and a brief revival in early 1927). She also sang onstage with an early singing trio, the Hamilton Sisters and Fordyce, later known as The Three X Sisters. Kane's roommate in the early 1920s was Jessie Fordyce. The singing trio act might have become the Hamilton Sisters and Schroeder, however Pearl Hamilton chose Fordyce to tour as a trio act "just to see what happens" at the end of the theatrical season. Kane's career break came in 1927, when she appeared in a musical called A Night in Spain. It ran from May 3, 1927 through Nov 12, 1927 for a total of 174 performances, at the 44th Street Theatre in NYC. Subsequently, Paul Ash, a band conductor, put her name forward for a performance at New York's Paramount Theater. Kane's first performance at the Paramount Theater in Times Square proved to be her career's launching point. She was singing "That's My Weakness Now", when she interpolated the scat lyrics "boop-boop-a-doop." This resonated with the flapper culture, and four days later, Helen Kane's name went up in lights. Kane recorded 22 songs between 1928 and 1930. After 1930 and up to 1951, she recorded four sides for Columbia in addition to the "Three Little Words" soundtrack single recording of "I Wanna Be Loved by You" She also recorded four songs that comprise a 1954 MGM 45Ep entitled, "The Boop Boop a Doop Girl". As she took on the status of a singing sensation, there were Helen Kane dolls and Helen Kane look-alike contests, appearances on radio and in nightclubs. This cult following reached its peak in late 1928 and stayed there until early 1929. Kane's height (only 5 feet tall) and slightly plump figure attracted attention and fans. Her round face with big brown eyes was topped by black, curly hair; her voice was a baby squeak with a distinct Bronx dialect. With the hardships of the Great Depression biting, the flamboyant world of the flapper was over, and Kane's style began to date rapidly. After 1931 she lost the favour of the movie makers, who chose other singers for their films. She appeared in a stage production called Shady Lady in 1933, and made appearances at various nightclubs and theatres during the 1930s. Helen Kane battled breast cancer for more than a decade. She had surgery in 1956 and eventually received two hundred radiation treatments as an outpatient at Memorial Hospital. She died on September 26, 1966 at age 62, in her apartment in Jackson Heights, Queens (New York City). Her husband of 27 years was at her bedside. Her remains were buried in the Long Island National Cemetery.
Views: 39680
271 ratings
Time: 02:56 More in Music

Marion Harris (1896 - April 23, 1944) was an American popular singer around 1920. She was the first widely known white singer to sing jazz and blues songs. Born as Mary Ellen Harrison, probably in Indiana, Marion was also the Granddaughter of President (emeritus) Benjamin Harrison, and also Great Great Granddaughter to President (Emeritus) and Statesman William Henry "Tippicanoe" Harrison. Her family asked her to Change her name to Harris to avoid the scandal and stigma of having a "Show-person" in the family. She first played vaudeville and movie theatres in Chicago around 1914. She was spotted by dancer Vernon Castle, who enabled her entrance into the New York theatre scene where she debuted in a 1915 Irving Berlin revue titled Stop! Look! Listen!. In 1916 she began recording for Victor Records, singing a variety of songs such as "Everybody's Crazy 'Bout the Doggone Blues, But I'm Happy", "After You've Gone", "When I Hear that Jazz Band Play", her biggest success "I Ain't Got Nobody", and "A Good Man Is Hard to Find", later recorded by Bessie Smith. Marion was also the Grandduaghter of President (emeritus) Benjamin Harrison, and also Great Great Garndduaghter to President (Emeritus) and Statesman William Henry "Tippicanoe" Harrison. Her family asked her to Change her name to Harris to avoid (Heavens forfend!!!) the scandal and stigma of having a "Show-person" in the family. In 1920, after the Victor label would not allow her to record W.C. Handy's "St. Louis Blues", she joined Columbia Records where she recorded the song successfully. Sometimes billed as "The Queen of the Blues", she tended to record blues- or jazz-flavoured tunes throughout her career. Handy wrote of Harris that "she sang blues so well that people hearing her records sometimes thought that the singer was colored". She herself said:"..you usually do best what comes naturally [and] so I just naturally started singing Southern dialect songs and the modern blues songs.." In 1922 she moved to the Brunswick label. She also continued to appear in Broadway theatres throughout the 1920s. She regularly played the Palace Theatre, appeared in Florenz Ziegfeld's Midnight Frolic, and toured the country with vaudeville shows[10]. After a marriage which produced two children, and her subsequent divorce, she returned to the theatre in New York in 1927, and returned to the Victor label to make more recordings. Also that year, she appeared in an eight minute promotional film, Marion Harris, Songbird Of Jazz, and made a flop Hollywood movie, the early musical Devil-May-Care with Ramon Navarro. She then temporarily withdrew from performance, because of an undisclosed illness. In 1931 she moved to London, and performed at the Café de Paris and on BBC radio. She also recorded in England in the early 1930s, but retired soon afterwards and married an English theatrical agent. Their house was destroyed in a German rocket attack in 1941, and in 1944 she travelled to New York to seek treatment for a neurological disorder. Although she was discharged two months later, she died soon afterwards in a hotel fire that started when she fell asleep while smoking in bed. Marion Harris - I Ain't Got Nobody (1916)
Views: 83398
327 ratings
Time: 03:28 More in Music

-"CLOSE YOUR EYES" (By Bernice Petkere, 1933) was recorded in Los Angeles, California on September 21, 1933 by Ruth Etting-vocal, accompanied by Victor Young & His Orchestra. Close your eyes Rest your head on my shoulder and sleep Close your eyes And I will close mine Close your eyes Let's pretend that we're both counting sheep Close your eyes All this is divine Under a midnight sky Watching a single star Thrilled by the beauty up above Alone just you and I Hearing a steel guitar Thrilled by the beauty of our love Close your eyes Rest your head on my shoulder and sleep Close your eyes And I will close mine Close your eyes Let's pretend that we're both counting sheep Close your eyes All This is divine Music play Something dreamy for dancing While we're romancing It's love's holiday And love will be our guide Close your eyes When you open them dear I'll be near By your side So won't you close your eyes?
From: Aad Juijn
Views: 57787
347 ratings
Time: 02:56 More in Music

Ruth Etting sings "If I Could Be With You (One Hour Tonight)" from 1930.
Views: 81501
345 ratings
Time: 02:50 More in Music

'Deed I Do By Fred Rose and Walter Hirsch Recorded by Ruth Etting on December 1, 1926, in Chicago Originally issued on Columbia 865-D (Matrix W142974) I was oh, so blue till you came along, Just to make my life a wonderful song, You brought sunshine just to brighten my loneliness. Is it any wonder in my happiness, I confess [Chorus:] Do I want you Oh my, do I? Honey, 'deed I do! Do I need you? Oh my, do I Honey, 'deed I do! I'm glad that I'm the one who found you, That's why I'm always hangin' 'round you. Do I love you? Oh my, do I? Honey, 'deed I do! There are lots of others that I have met, Those you meet today, tomorrow forget, You're the only one who ever could stand the test. That's the reason why I choose you from the rest, You're the best [repeat chorus]
From: Aad Juijn
Views: 35321
203 ratings
Time: 02:59 More in Music

Ruth Etting (Nov.23,1896 - Sept.24,1978) was an American singing star of the 1930s, who had over sixty hit recordings. Rising to fame in the twenties and early thirties, Ruth Etting was renowned for her great beauty, her gorgeous voice and her tragic life. She starred on Broadway, made movies in Hollywood, married a mobster, had numerous hit-records, fell in love and was known as America's Sweetheart of Song. Born in David City, Nebraska, Ruth left home at seventeen for Chicago and art school. She got a job designing costumes at a night club called the Marigold Gardens and when the tenor got sick, she was pulled into the show since she was the only one who could sing low enough. That led to dancing in the chorus line and eventually featured solos. Her career in costume design and art was soon forgotten. The blond hair and blue eyes and stunning voice all led to her being dubbed the Sweetheart of Columbia Records, America's Radio Sweetheart, and finally America's Sweetheart of Song. She began to experiment with tempo and phrasing during this period in her career. Her trademark was to change the tempo - alternating between normal tempo, half-time and double-time to create and maintain interest. Ruth Etting made her first record in 1926 and her last in 1937. Completely lacking in the performer's ego, she called her early recordings corny and kept none of her original 78's. In 1955 her story was made into a movie, ultimately nominated for six Academy Awards and winning the Award for Best Story. Ruth Etting died on September 24 1978, in Colorado Springs. Ruth Etting - Exactly Like You (1930)
Views: 24825
116 ratings
Time: 03:09 More in Music

Marion Harris (1896 - April 23, 1944) was an American popular singer around 1920. She was the first widely known white singer to sing jazz and blues songs. Born Mary Ellen Harrison, probably in Indiana, she first played vaudeville and movie theatres in Chicago around 1914. She was spotted by dancer Vernon Castle, who enabled her entrance into the New York theatre scene where she debuted in a 1915 Irving Berlin revue titled Stop! Look! Listen!. In 1916 she began recording for Victor Records, singing a variety of songs such as "Everybody's Crazy 'Bout the Doggone Blues, But I'm Happy", "After You've Gone", "When I Hear that Jazz Band Play", her biggest success "I Ain't Got Nobody", and "A Good Man Is Hard to Find", later recorded by Bessie Smith. In 1920, after the Victor label would not allow her to record W.C. Handy's "St. Louis Blues", she joined Columbia Records where she recorded the song successfully. Sometimes billed as "The Queen of the Blues", she tended to record blues- or jazz-flavoured tunes throughout her career. Handy wrote of Harris that "she sang blues so well that people hearing her records sometimes thought that the singer was colored". She herself said:"..you usually do best what comes naturally [and] so I just naturally started singing Southern dialect songs and the modern blues songs.." In 1922 she moved to the Brunswick label. She also continued to appear in Broadway theatres throughout the 1920s. She regularly played the Palace Theatre, appeared in Florenz Ziegfeld's Midnight Frolic, and toured the country with vaudeville shows[10]. After a marriage which produced two children, and her subsequent divorce, she returned to the theatre in New York in 1927, and returned to the Victor label to make more recordings. Also that year, she appeared in an eight minute promotional film, Marion Harris, Songbird Of Jazz, and made a flop Hollywood movie, the early musical Devil-May-Care with Ramon Navarro. She then temporarily withdrew from performance, because of an undisclosed illness. In 1931 she moved to London, and performed at the Café de Paris and on BBC radio. She also recorded in England in the early 1930s, but retired soon afterwards and married an English theatrical agent. Their house was destroyed in a German rocket attack in 1941, and in 1944 she travelled to New York to seek treatment for a neurological disorder. Although she was discharged two months later, she died soon afterwards in a hotel fire that started when she fell asleep while smoking in bed. Marion Harris - After You've Gone (1918) Victor-18509
Views: 253226
958 ratings
Time: 03:20 More in Music

(Jun.24,1900 - Jan.24,1972) He was a popular screen, radio & recording artist during the mid 1920's into the 1930's. He was known as "the voice of the south land" and a pioneer in the "crooning" style of singing. A jazz artist at heart, he was equally at home singing country ballads, blues and spirituals. His improvisational style apparent in his recordings, added a unique flavor to his interpretations. Gene Austin - Tonight You Belong To Me (1927)
Views: 147430
623 ratings
Time: 03:34 More in Music

Ruth Etting (Nov.23,1896 - Sept.24,1978) was an American singing star of the 1930s, who had over sixty hit recordings. Rising to fame in the twenties and early thirties, Ruth Etting was renowned for her great beauty, her gorgeous voice and her tragic life. She starred on Broadway, made movies in Hollywood, married a mobster, had numerous hit-records, fell in love and was known as America's Sweetheart of Song. Born in David City, Nebraska, Ruth left home at seventeen for Chicago and art school. She got a job designing costumes at a night club called the Marigold Gardens and when the tenor got sick, she was pulled into the show since she was the only one who could sing low enough. That led to dancing in the chorus line and eventually featured solos. Her career in costume design and art was soon forgotten. The blond hair and blue eyes and stunning voice all led to her being dubbed the Sweetheart of Columbia Records, America's Radio Sweetheart, and finally America's Sweetheart of Song. She began to experiment with tempo and phrasing during this period in her career. Her trademark was to change the tempo - alternating between normal tempo, half-time and double-time to create and maintain interest. Ruth Etting made her first record in 1926 and her last in 1937. Completely lacking in the performer's ego, she called her early recordings corny and kept none of her original 78's. In 1955 her story was made into a movie, ultimately nominated for six Academy Awards and winning the Award for Best Story. Ruth Etting died on September 24 1978, in Colorado Springs. Ruth Etting - Shaking The Blues Away (1927)
Views: 20901
125 ratings
Time: 03:10 More in Music

Gene Austin was a popular screen, radio & recording artist during the mid 1920's into the 1930's. He was known as "the voice of the south land" and a pioneer in the "crooning" style of singing. A jazz artist at heart, he was equally at home singing country ballads, blues and spirituals. His improvisational style apparent in his recordings, added a unique flavor to his interpretations.
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Time: 03:37 More in Music

Reached US Billboard # 2 - 1931 (6 weeks)
Views: 33720
189 ratings
Time: 03:09 More in Music

"MY BLUE HEAVEN" Music by Walter Donaldson Lyrics by George Whiting Performed by Paul Whiteman and His Orchestra Recorded July 6, 1927, New York Victor 20828 Personnel: Henry Busse, Red Nichols - trumpets Wilbur Hall, trombone, Jack Fulton, Tommy Dorsey - Trombones Max Farley, Chester Hazlett, Hal McLean, Jimmy Dorsey? - reeds Charles Strickfaden - alto sax, baritone sax Kurt Dieterle, Mischa Russell,Mario Perry, Matt Malneck - violins Harry Perella - piano Mike Pingitore - banjo John Sperzel - tuba Harold MacDonald - drums Jack Fulton, Chester Gaylord, Austin Young, Bing Crosby, Al Rinker - vocals Walter Donaldson wrote this song in 1925 at the Friars Club while waiting for a billiards game to begin. Donaldson played the tune for vaudeville star George Whitiing, who was so enthusiastic that he begged to write the lyric. Whiting performed the song but it would not catch on. Later in 1927, Tommy Lyman sang it on the radio and then Gene Austin recorded the song for Victor. That recording and Austin's covers of the song sold more than 5 million copies. (notes from "The American Songbook: the singers, the songwriters, and the songs" by Ken Bloom)
From: bsgs98
Views: 130209
456 ratings
Time: 02:58 More in Music